Political and Social Movement

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

People often talk about love and revolution as though their relationship was self-evident. In this session, movement-based thinkers, authors, and organizers will explore the connection in greater depth. If it's true, as Che proclaimed, that "the true revolutionary is guided by great feelings of love," it is necessary to devise a clear understanding of those feelings and their implications.
Join AK Thompson (Co-Editor of Spontaneous Combustion: The Eros Effect and Global Revolution [SUNY Press, 2017]), Kazembe Balagun (Staff Person, Rosa Luxemburg Foundation, New York), and Kelli Korducki (Author of Hard To Do: The Suprising, Feminist History of Breaking Up [Coach House Books, 2018]) as we get to the heart of the matter.

Location: 
NYC
Description/Abstract of your Event: 

The wave of teachers’ strikes that began in West Virginia and spread to Oklahoma, Kentucky, Colorado and Arizona has proven to be an incredible demonstration of working-class power in the face of austerity and privatization. Education workers have shown a willingness to take risks and withhold their labor to demand better working conditions and treatment on the job. And the strikes have been led by the rank-and-file, which in some cases have been in tension with union leadership. But should these labor actions be considered “wildcat” strikes? How can they inform organizing by other rank-and-file teachers across the country? And what can the labor movement learn from such militant organizing in “right to work” states when the entire public sector is under threat by the Supreme Court's upcoming Janus decision? We will discuss these and more questions with labor experts and teacher organizers.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Since the 1970s, capitalists strategies of neoliberalism combined with accelerating automation have had a devastating effect on working class organizations and communities. Through advancing workers control and the workers-owned cooperative enterprise, we begin to counter the class warfare strategies that have set us back. This panel examines strategies and practices that counter the neoliberal offensive.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

The right to health care is a critical component of a winning strategy for the Left. Getting rid of the for-profit system of insurance and implementing an improved, expanded Medicare for All program has never been more popular among the American people, and has a real chance of passage in several states in the near future. The presenters, all activists and advocates in this movement, will update Left Forum participants on our movement at both the national and state levels.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Resistance to the carceral state has always been at the forefront of Leftist agendas. More specifically, the exercise of weaponized violence calls to question the role that the police play in constructing an “American” cultural identity. This panel raises key questions: what spaces and places do, and will, policing/law enforcement agencies occupy in an ongoing process of building a new global Left, as their material and cultural reach and ramifications continue to escalate and accelerate exponentially? Why/ do we need law enforcement? How do we begin to understand social imperatives of policing beyond the work of local enforcement agencies, but also an act culturally embedded into quotidian American life? How do oppositional communities connect across differently resourced and governed spaces to work with or within what some consider protracted, multifaceted genocide?

This discussion features dialogue between activist-scholars across disciplines engaging attendees around discourses of prison and policing reform, abolition, and restorative justice- and the obstacles and promises of inhabiting and contributing toward each. Drawing from works in digital humanities, communication, critical race/ethnic studies, and community activism, this panel seeks to critically examine the stakes of addressing policing in the New World, and what this may look like among different spaces that comprise the global Left.

Kim Clark, Art Culture Movement, FREE! Families Rally for Emancipation and Empowerment will share a ten-minute clip from a 2018 public access TV program entitled No Place for Police (produced collaboratively by Clark and Jones), which highlights challenges with policing and police violence in schools, and will engage more broadly in interrogating what the proper place of police is in our local communities, and how this points toward possibilities for radical transnational (or broader) solidarities.

Aundrey Jones, UC San Diego, Ethnic Studies, Pillars of the Community, All of Us or None: will cover a broad history of carceral resistance in Southern California. Looking at different collectives of Left organizing as it relates specifically to Black/Brown people in Los Angeles since WWII, and how these communities have constructed meanings of life and struggle while living under the precarious auspices of carceral Los Angeles.

Kathie Cheng, Stolen Lives Project, will discuss ways the Stolen Lives Project has been documenting those killed by U.S. law enforcement since 1996. How does this work counter normalized narratives which justify police/state violence by providing stories and data that challenge and reframe rarely adequately investigated or made known circumstances surrounding the deaths of their victims? Through these narratives, the SLP illustrates how police brutality is normalized and constructed as expected and acceptable through mainstream media’s tarnishing of victim reputations, despite being categorization as a negative phenomenon.

Kerry Keith will examine covert and overt policing and surveillance strategies operationalized after one is released from prison. Troubling the watch tactics imposed through parole, often a site for reformist action, is instead examined as a direct continuation of policed behavioral expectations designed to re-criminate rather than rehabilitate, revealing socio-cultural agnosia which endangers anti-incarceration movements. Keith draws on systems that counter parole’s watch, speculating on possibilities of a non-policed release from prison.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

This panel will discuss the renewed Jewish Left, especially its focus on Diasporic Jewish renewal, action and materialism.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

The entire left is struggling towards a coherent electoral strategy. On
the one hand, many committed activists continue to feel they must vote
for 'progressive' Democrats. On the other, a huge segment of newly
radicalized fighters for social change have become totally disillusioned
from electoral politics altogether. Perhaps there is a third way. Hear
different perspectives from activists who have run or are running
electoral campaigns independent of the Democrats and join a discussion on
how the movement can make a definite break with the parties of big
business.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

What are the limits and aspirations of a love-driven politics and/or a
theology of love for the 21st Century?
How do we bring together the work of love and a call to prophetic witness?
This panel will explore the theological, moral, cultural, and political
conditions for the possibility of radical love for our times.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Perhaps the most long-standing and intractable crisis in the world, Israel/Palestine, has now reached beyond catastrophic proportions. The panel will focus on the various ways the issue affects and infects American politics. We will discuss the origins of the present situation and the influence of Washington lobbies, and offer ideas and strategies for ways toward a just solution.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Join rank-and-file labor activists from CUNY, UMass Boston, Columbia, and Barnard, for an open discussion on the way forward for rank-and-file academic organizing. This panel will emphasize dialogue between panelists and attendees. Please come and share your experiences!